CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT IN AN ELEMENTARY SPANISH CLASS

CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT IN AN ELEMENTARY SPANISH CLASS

Classroom management is definitely a skill that you build with practice. And it’s something that is constantly changing and evolving according to the different personalities of your students and classroom chemistry. What works with one class might not work with another, or what worked one school year might not work the next. I find myself continuously changing and adapting my classroom management strategies.

Writing this post is a reflection exercise for me. In the past, I had assumed that because the homeroom teachers I worked with had been investing time (not spending, or as we might say in a literal translation of Spanish, “wasting”) in going over classroom rules, creating beautiful agreements, their students would automatically come to me ready to engage and learn!  How wrong I was! If the homeroom teacher has been investing time in making it a safe learning environment for everyone, I also have to do my part. Children need to see that teachers are all working together, and that we all have the same high expectations for them. Quite often we “special teachers” don’t start teaching on the very first day. What a great opportunity to go into the classrooms and learn the language and procedures homeroom teachers are using with their students.

Let Your Students Know A Little Bit About You

I started day one in my classes with a “Get to know the teacher” activity. I have done it different ways in the past. I have created a picture book about me, PowerPoint presentations, and these last two years I have made videos using PowToon. This is a short version I created to share here. In the presentation I use with my students, I add pictures of my family too. They love it! After watching the short video, we played a simple “cierto” and “falso” game. I also use this as an opportunity to connect with other students by asking simple questions such as ¿quién tiene perros?, ¿a quién le gusta el brócoli? or ¿a quién no le gusta el brócoli?, ¿qué te gusta comer?, and the conversation gets long! Some of my classes have asked to watch it a few times!

By first sharing a little bit about me with my students, I find that it is easier to start working on creating a class with a safe learning environment. I also invest a lot of time in talking about these rules in English, although the signs are in Spanish. I have noticed that starting with English and making sure my students understand and practice the rules will save me from having to use a lot of English later. With elementary students it takes a lot of practice. You kind of have to use the pattern of modeling, talking, and practicing. It is a lot of time at the beginning of the school year, but having the routines and rules well established will allow me to stay in the target language for more time. So far my grades 1-2 students (I haven’t met kinder yet) enter the classroom by greeting me in Spanish, and the grades 3-5 students enter the classroom using “La frase de la semana.”

Keep Your Rules Simple

These are the rules that I have been using for the last couple of years. I wish I could say I came up with them, but they were shared by my two colleagues who have used them in the past. They are simple, concrete, and easy to TPR. We talk about how each of them looks, and we model, practice, and talk again!

 

All the images above were created by “A Sketchy Guy”

Once in the room, we talk about how they transition to their places in class. I started by not assigning spots or chairs in the classroom, but quickly noticed some of my students were having a hard time finding a place, so I decided to assign places in class. I have seen my students about 7 times this school year, and so far we have started every class by pointing at the posters, practicing and reinforcing them. These are the rules that I currently use with my students.

Introduce Other Routines

I also introduce the children to respond to the sound of the chime and teach some of the call and response chants that we will be using through the school year. During the first week, students also get to know our classroom, and the different procedures to use the materials we have in it. My school has a strong Social Emotional Learning (SEL) program and uses a lot of Responsive Classroom techniques, so many classrooms have a “Take a break” space. I call it “El espacio de la reflexión.” Responsive Classroom has a great explanation of this strategy.

I’m a brain break lover, so I definitely make sure to start using them with my students from day one! Elementary students need to move a lot, so this is a “must do” in all my lessons. It’s extremely important to introduce all your routines during the first weeks. Depending on the level, I either end the class with a song, exit ticket,  or a simple “chócala” to send my students to line up quietly.

So far everything has been going great! Fingers crossed that it will continue that way. How do you do classroom management in your Spanish class? Please feel free to share in the comments!

Have an awesome school year!

LA FRASE DE LA SEMANA IN ELEMENTARY SPANISH

LA FRASE DE LA SEMANA IN ELEMENTARY SPANISH

“La frase de la semana” or phrase of the week is a great opportunity to teach useful language. I try to use phrases that I know we can incorporate into our classes. I teach grades K-5, but I only use it with my students in grades 3-5.

We make it part of our routine. I keep a poster with the phrase of the week taped on the door.  I sometimes teach classes back to back, and having this routine can buy me an extra minute while I am getting everything ready for the next class. My students wait for me in a line outside my class.

La frase de la semana serves as their password to enter the classroom. It takes about two minutes on average, so children know that they need to find their place quietly in the room and read the “Plan de la clase” to find out what we will be doing (although there are days when this goes more smoothly than other days). I don’t have a variety of classroom jobs because I find the logistics hard for me, but I do have a “secretario” and “secretaria” who help by passing out materials when needed, sharpen pencils, turns lights on and off, and so on. After children have practiced with it and have the routine down pat, I sometimes ask the secretarios to help me by staying by the door and listening to their classmates say la frase de la semana. I love when they start using those sentences in natural ways and in the context of the class. It’s magical when I start to hear spontaneous remarks like “¡Qué chévere!” or “¿Qué tal Sra. Gómez?” when students see me during recess or in the hallway.

Here are some of the phrases I have used:

¡Qué bueno!

Para nada

¡Genial!

¡A mí también!

¡Qué chévere!

¡Me encanta!

¿Qué pasa?

You can also find more phrases on “Mis cositas.” Lori Langer de Rámirez is so generous and shares tons of resources on her blog. Make sure to stop by her blog and download “Passwords perfectos.”

Ben Slavic also has a wonderful site with tons of  CI/TPRS resources. He shares a list of great rejoinders that can also be used with la frase de la semana.

Feeling ready to start with la frase de la semana? Download this free resource that will help you get ready!

Have fun!

“MUST HAVE” FOR ELEMENTARY SPANISH TEACHERS

“MUST HAVE” FOR ELEMENTARY SPANISH TEACHERS

This a list of what I have in my classroom and can’t survive a school year without any of these materials.

Chime: Sometimes we need breaks from using call-and-response chants or clapping our hands. I have found a three tone chime* that works well because it gives enough time for my students to settle down.

Map: I had a hard time finding a map that was simple enough for my elementary students. Luckily I came across this map on Pinterest, and it has been the best purchase ever. You can find it at Spanish Cuentos.

Puppets and Plush Toys: Puppets and plush toys are a great tool in language teaching. I love when my students make connections with some of them. They become one more member of the class. Visit my post where I talk about the use of puppets in a world language class.

 

Special Chair: I have a chair that my students use when we sing to them to celebrate their birthdays in class. They all look forward to having a chance to sit on that chair in class. They also get a small gift from me which is usually a pencil, eraser, or small craft from Colombia. They also get a birthday certificate. Click here to download some free ones for your classes!

Play Parachute: Every single one of my students seems to love parachute time, no matter how old they are. It’s always fun to use parachutes for a brain break. I have written a few posts about how I use them in my classes:

Authentic Art: I love displaying art from different Spanish speaking countries. I usually label items to show where they come from.

Favorite Music Playlist: Thank goodness for YouTube! I love how you can easily make lists of your favorite songs. I like creating playlists by grade levels. Here is a list of some of my go-to channels:

Flags: I have flags and posters from the different Spanish speaking countries. You can display them all at once or take them out one at a time when you do the country of study. This pack is available on Teachers Pay Teachers.

Pointers: I found a really awesome set of pointers* that I use while looking at our “Plan de la clase” as well as when we play interactive games on the Smart Board. These ones have been the best so far! I have had them for about two years now:

List of Brain Breaks: Brain breaks are great not only to get your students’ attention back, but also for you to take a break as a teacher. I keep a list of brain breaks and yoga cards handy. Download free yoga cards here!

Simple Picture Books: Last year I started a library in my classroom. So far the books that have worked best are books with minimal text and also books that the children are already familiar with in English.

Movies: Sometimes I like using movies right before the break when I know a lot of my students will be missing. I also use them when I am out and can’t find a sub that speaks Spanish, or just being honest, to take a break!

Balls: Yes, balls of different sizes to play games or ask questions!

Instruments: Playing with these is something my younger students really enjoy!

Apron: This is not a “must,” but it has been great for me to stop putting things in my pockets when I am teaching. I used to always end up emptying my pockets of an assortment of things at home that should have stayed at school instead of hitching a ride with me – things like tiny pointers, markers, pencils, and the classroom keys. This is the one I plan to use this school year. I am especially excited about the llamas on this one!

 

What is something you think I should add to this list? Please feel free to leave your suggestions in the comments box.

Have fun!

*Indicates Amazon affiliate link.

Raising Awareness to Protect the Spectacled Bear #PonteLosAnteojosPorLaVida

Raising Awareness to Protect the Spectacled Bear #PonteLosAnteojosPorLaVida

February 21st is International Save Bears Day. This day seeks to raise awareness to protect these beautiful animals. The National Park Service of Colombia has made this day “El día del oso de anteojos” (spectacled bear), in order to raise awareness in the country. El oso de anteojos is also known as the “oso andino.” It is found in the Andean nations of Venezuela, Colombia, Bolivia, Ecuador and Perú. Will you put on your glasses to join the celebration? Find out more about how to join this effort to raise awareness at “Conservemos la vida”: http://conservacionosoandino.org/

Get ready to sing this song to celebrate los osos de anteojos!

Visit Mundo de Pepita’s blog to print the awesome glasses template she created to help you take part in this celebration!

Last, but not least, visit la Corporación Autónoma Regional de Cundinamarca to see this beautiful oso in action!

Don’t forget to put your glasses on and join #PonteLosAnteojosPorLaVida
Carolina

Latin American Christmas Tradition: Año Viejo {Giveaway}

It has been a long time since I’ve hosted a giveaway, but I couldn’t exist this great opportunity to host one that allows me to share one of the traditions that I miss the most when I’m unable to be in Colombia for the holidays.

Growing up in Colombia I remember all the hurried confusion that suddenly erupted during the last five minutes of every year: listening to “Faltan cinco’ pa las doce” and the poem called “El brindis del bohemio”, getting the 12 grapes ready, looking for a suitcase if you hoped to travel, putting dollars in your pocket to become rich in the new year, making sure you have “los cucos amarillos” (yellow underwear) and last, but not least, the excitement of burning the Año Viejo. Traditionally a full-sized stuffed mannequin and filled with fireworks or gunpowder and straw, an Año Viejo symbolizes starting anew, leaving bad things behind and setting goals for the new year – like a reset button (in addition to making political statements). Due to safety issues, many cities have opted to ban full-sized Años Viejos. So instead of coming together neighbors, blocks, or small communities, Años Viejos are now more of an individual family thing, reduced to a smaller, safer size. But no matter what, burning the Año Viejo is always followed by the sound of a new song on the air, “El año viejo”!

I have written all about this tradition in the past. Please visit this post to learn all about it!

Ready to participate in the giveaway? 


If you would like to participate in this giveaway and have the opportunity to win this awesome Año Viejo set,  just enter below to participate. The winner will be announced on November 30th, 2017. Participants in the continental United States only.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

¡Buena suerte!
Carolina
Virtual Field Trips in Elementary Spanish Class

Virtual Field Trips in Elementary Spanish Class

There is nothing children enjoy more than pretending! Role playing games are such valuable tools for teaching languages. Planning a virtual trip requires some planning. You have to make sure the content is suitable for the level you teach. 


Introduction of a country or cultural activity:

 
1. Passport: You can create a simple template that your students will have to fill out with basic information such as name, age, and country where they were born. They can draw a small picture about themselves. 
2. Ticket: The ticket will have their seat and arrival country.
3. Sitting on an airplane: You may need to adapt this based on your space and the amount of time you have available to set up. I usually like making single lines and numbering the chairs from 1 to 20, depending on the number of students you have. Each student gets assigned a number. You can have two students pretend being the flight attendance to greet everyone when getting on the plane. This might take up to 5 minutes.  You can also pretend that you have a pilot who will welcome everyone and let them know where they are heading to. For example, “Buenos días, Bienvenidos al vuelo de la clase de español. Vamos a Colombia.”
4. Google Earth: This requires some advance planning. You might want to choose the pictures of the places you would like to visit. I found a post written by The Teacher’s Prep with great information on using Google Earth: Create a Virtual Trip Using Google Earth

 

5. Choose a few short videos about the country you plan to visit.6. Postcard: Have the children make a postcard that they can pretend to send to a family member. The postcard can have information about what they learned during the virtual trip.

Steps 4 and 5 might require a few class sessions to complete while the children do the cultural exploration. This also depends on how many times you see your students and the kind of program in which you teach. Some teachers prefer to do the cultural part in English , while others keep the target language basic and at the level of their students. 

I have a “Travel Set Activity” in my TpT store that I have used successfully with my students. Everything is ready to set up, and it even includes printable stamps that students can add to their passport every time they visit a new country. Click on the picture to learn all about it!
Have a fun trip!

 

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