GAMES TO PLAY WITH FLASH CARDS




I am a Spanish teacher who travels to different classrooms. I carry a lot in my bags, and it can be a pain at times. This is when having a set of flashcards can be really handy, instead of lugging tons of heavy materials around! Plus, my students really enjoy playing games like the ones you will find below.
 
 

The Flyswatter

Place different flashcards on a table or the floor. Describe one of the flashcards. For example, It’s a big animal, its colors are black and white and it says “moo”. After the description, have one of your students tap or slap the right card using a fly swatter.

 

What’s missing?

Place 3 to 5 flashcards on a table or on the floor. Look at them with your students and name each of them. Have one of your students close his/her eyes while you hide one of the cards. Have your student open his/her eyes to guess the name of the card that is missing.

 

The jumping game

Place a line of flashcards on a table or the floor. Call out some of the vocabulary placed on the line and have one of your students jump next to the correct card.

Place a flashcard in a box and have a volunteer guess the name of the card in the box. You can give your child some cues about the card.
 

Little translator

Show one side of the card and have your students give you the word in the other language.

 

Storytellers

Arrange a set of flashcards in a pile. Take the first several flashcards and create a sentence. Have your students take another flashcard to continue with the story. Continue with the same procedure until all the flashcards in the pile are gone.

Download your free flash cards HERE! 

 

Have fun playing in Spanish!

 

GET YOUR SPANISH CLASS IN THE SUMMER MOOD WITH THIS SUNGLASSES ON THE SUN GAME

GET YOUR SPANISH CLASS IN THE SUMMER MOOD WITH THIS SUNGLASSES ON THE SUN GAME

As the warmer months approach, it’s a great time to infuse some summer fun into your Spanish language classes! One way to do this is by introducing the chant “Ponle las gafas al sol” (Put Sunglasses on the Sun), which is not only easy to teach but also a lot of fun.

To get started, all you need are a few materials, such as paper and scissors, to create a paper sun and some paper sunglasses. The chant itself is short and simple, consisting of just a few lines that can be easily memorized by students of all ages and levels of Spanish proficiency.

As you lead your students in chanting “Sol, sol, sol, amarillo es tu color” (Sun, sun, sun, yellow is your color), you can incorporate some movement and gestures to make the experience even more engaging. For example, students can hold up their paper sunglasses as they sing, or even take turns placing them on the paper sun.

This chant is a great way to not only introduce some fun into your classroom, but it’s also a great way to welcome the summer season to your classes!

Sol, sol, sol,

Amarillo es tu color.

¡Es verano y llegó el calor!*

Your students are sure to love it, and you may just find that it’s a great way to keep them engaged and motivated throughout the season. ¡Feliz verano! (Happy summer!) 
Have fun!
Carolina
 
 

*This chant was written by Carolina Gómez, the Spanish teacher behind Fun for Spanish Teachers ©2012

EL PATO: A FUN GAME FOR SPANISH CLASS

EL PATO: A FUN GAME FOR SPANISH CLASS

Boston is finally experiencing some wonderful weather, which has inspired me to take advantage of the outdoors before the end of the school year arrives. To review and reinforce some of the units we’ve explored this year, I’ve decided to dedicate the remaining days to playing outdoor games.

One game I introduced to my kindergarteners was a chant-based activity that we previously learned in the classroom. It was incredibly enjoyable, and all of the students were eager to participate. The game itself is straightforward and comes with a chant that guides movement and dancing:

“Un pato, un pato con una pata,

un pato con las dos patas,

un pato con las alitas,

un pato con la colita

y ahora te toca a ti!”

Translated into English, the chant means “A duck, a duck with one leg, a duck with two legs, a duck with wings, a duck with a tail, and now it’s your turn!” The children stand in a circle, and the chant is recited while everyone moves and dances according to its instructions. One child is then selected to dance in the middle of the circle while the rest of the class chants “pato, pato, pato!” or “duck, duck, duck!”

This game is never-ending because everyone wants a chance to be “el pato” or “the duck.” It’s a delightful way for the children to enjoy the beauty of the outdoors while also chanting in Spanish.

If you’re interested, feel free to give it a try and let me know how it goes!

Have fun!