PLAY THE LOBO GAME IN SPANISH CLASS

PLAY THE LOBO GAME IN SPANISH CLASS

I have blogged about this traditional game in the past. This game is usually played without props, but to make it comprehensible I have created some to go along with the game. I am not the best illustrator, but I am happy to share this with you since some teachers were requesting the template to create their own. Stop by my previous post to understand how to play this game. Remember to download the props here! Once you download the props, print them on stock paper, laminate them for durability, and add some magnets on the back to place them on a magnetic board or cookie sheet just like the picture below. Please click here to learn how to play this game.

Get ready to play the game and sing along with this video:

Have fun!

 

You might like these resources available on Teachers Pay Teachers:

Hispanic

 

LUIS PESCETTI’S GROUP GAMES

LUIS PESCETTI’S GROUP GAMES

Luis Pescetti is an Argentinian musician, writer, actor, and storyteller. He is also known for for his great group activities that are fun and encourage movement (which is why they are called ‘dinámicas’ in Spanish). Some of his group games work great in the Spanish classroom and can be used as energizers or brain breaks for you and your students.

For this game I would suggest you ask your students to be in groups of five or less to keep it safe.

¿Por qué me sube la bilirubina? No sé porque.

¿Por qué me sube la bilirubina? No sé porque.

A moler café, a moler café, a moler a moler a moler café.

A moler café, a moler café, a moler a moler a moler café.

This is simple but a bit challenging for second graders. I mostly use it for third graders and up. A lot of fun!

Palo, palo, palo, palo bonito, palo eh,

eh, eh, eh, palo bonito, palo eh.

This is one of the group activities my first graders love. The first time they saw the video they were scared, but we couldn’t stop laughing afterwards. It’s great to use during Halloween!

Se hace de noche,

se ve un castillo,

se abre una puerta,

sale un vampiro,

saca un cuchillo y …

unta pan con mantequilla,

unta pan con mantequilla,

unta pan con mantequilla.

This activity works great in a circle. This one gets everyone quiet and focused on the movement. My students were a little frustrated at first, but once we all got it, it became a fun challenge.

Bale, bale, bale, pata zum, zum, zum,

bale, zum, zum, zum,

pata zum, zum, zum.

Bale, bale, bale, pata zum, zum, zum,

bale, zum, pata zum, bale zum.

This can be done with different ages. It can be done fast or slow. A lot of fun!

A ram sam sam,

guli, guli, guli, guli, ram sam sam.

Arabi, arabi,

guli, guli, guli, guli, ram sam sam.

This video gives a little background for the song “A ram sam sam”.

Have fun!

FUN ACTIVITY TO USE AFTER ANY BREAK

FUN ACTIVITY TO USE AFTER ANY BREAK

This is a low prep activity that you can use after any break. It involves some movement and questions that can be asked about each slide. If you have used my “A mí también” activity, this works exactly the same way. If you haven’t used the activity, visit this link to learn how to use it.

Download the “Yo también” activity HERE.

Have fun!

 

TELEPHONE DICTATION: A TWIST ON RUNNING DICTATION

TELEPHONE DICTATION: A TWIST ON RUNNING DICTATION

If you don’t know the “Running Dictation” activity, this link has a great explanation about it. This game is a variation of the Running Dictation. I call it “Telephone Dictation” just to give it a new name, but I am sure someone else has adapted it too. I have used it with third and fourth graders, but I am sure it works with upper levels as well.

You will need:

  1. A clipboard.
  2. Five pieces of blank paper.
  3. A pencil.
  4. A chair or a place to put the sentences.
  5. Five or more sentences.

I divide my classes in groups of three or four. Each group gets a clipboard, a pencil, and five pieces of paper. Then I instruct them to sit in a line. I place all the materials in front of the line. I also place a chair with with 4 or 5 sentences at the end of the line. I recommend not using more than 5 sentences with lower grades.

The student who is at the end takes a sentence and reads it to the student sitting in front of him/her. Then that student whispers the sentence in the ear of the next student. They keep passing the message along until it makes it to the student at the front of the line. That student takes one of the pieces of paper and writes the message. When that student is done, he goes to the end of the line, takes a new sentence, and it starts all over again. I ask the student at the end of the line who is reading the sentence to crumple it up once they are done reading it.

Once they are all done with the sentences they have to get together to organize them and make sense of them. Taken together, the sentences usually relate to a story or book we are reading in class.

Are you ready to try this activity in your next class? Let me know how it goes!

Have fun!

You might like these resources available on Teachers Pay Teachers:


FUN GAME FOR SPANISH CLASS: COLOR COLORCITO

FUN GAME FOR SPANISH CLASS: COLOR COLORCITO

“Color colorcito” is a simple tag game that my kindergarten students love! In fact, they ask for it almost every class! I am still trying to understand why they love it so much, as it is just so simple. I have also used it as a brain break with my 4th and 5th grade students, and they have had the same exciting reaction. I don’t play as often with the older grade levels because we play it indoors in my classroom, where littler bodies have more space.

Before playing the game, it is important to state the rules clearly.  If playing it indoors, you might want to ask your students just to walk fast instead of running. I like playing in my classroom because I have so many colorful things in the room, and it makes it exciting for them to have so many options for the colors. I also need to remind them that they need to be careful with the posters, and any art I have in the room and our classroom library. Once the game is over, I ask everyone to check the room and help to make sure everything is how it was before playing the game.

I am lucky that I see my kindergarten students in groups of 8 which makes it easier to keep things under control. That being said, I have also played with my 18 fourth graders and 21 fifth graders and so far we haven’t had any collisions yet. Fingers crossed!

How to Play The Game

There is not really that much preparation, but I like to project slides on the board with the names of the different colors in Spanish, just in case any of the students forget how to say a color. 

*Thanks to Teacher’s Designs for the beautiful clipart

Pick one student to be “it.” That student will have to say “Color colorcito” followed by a color in Spanish. Students walk fast around the room looking for that color to touch to be safe. The “it” student will try to tag a student who is not touching the color. Then this student becomes the new “it” and the game starts all over again.

I typically play this game for no more than 3 or 4 minutes. It’s a good, quick brain break where everyone gets to participate and move a lot!

Are you ready to try it in your classes? Let me know in the comments how it goes!

You might like this resource on Teachers Pay Teachers:        

TRADITIONAL GAME: TINGO, TANGO

TRADITIONAL GAME: TINGO, TANGO

As far as I know, this game is only played in Colombia, but I am sure there are other variations in other parts of Latin America. I have been using this game as an energizer in my 4th and 5th grade classes. My students have really loved playing this game. I thought it would be great to share this with other teachers here.

In preparation for this game, all you need is a space where your students can sit in a circle and an object to pass around. I use a small ball made of fabric. I try not to use anything that will bounce off their hands because then it becomes a distraction for the students.

Students sit in a circle. Choose one student who will close her eyes and will be the one chanting “tingo….tango.” The children in the circle will be passing the object while she chants “tingo, tingo, tingo…” as much as possible. When the student who is chanting “tingo” says “tango,” the student who has the ball or small object must come to the middle of the circle to choose a “penalty.” I added a chart with penalties that I project up on the board in my room, so this way it is easier for my students to choose a penalty to do. I also added that the whole class says “penitencia” when the person who is saying “tingo” says “tango.” Some of the “penitencias” I use are taken from the movement cards I have previously shared in this blog. The penitencias are simple – for example, sing like a rooster, dance like ghost, or move your head like a turkey.

Once the student has completed the penalty, this same student takes the place of the person who was chanting “tingo….tango,” and the game starts all over again.

 

Have fun!