Las Ollitas {Traditional Game}

This is a fun game that is played in many Latin American countries. It’s simple, fun, and doesn’t require much preparation.  There are different versions of this game. I am sharing with you the one I remember playing with my friends in a (then) small neighborhood outside of Cali, Colombia. You will need a minimum of six participants to play the game. Each team will have three participants. One person is placed in the middle in a squatting position, grasping their hands between their legs. The two other members of the team have to pretend to prepare el “sancocho,” which is a traditional soup in Latin America. They have to pretend they are adding the ingredients to the bowl while saying the lines below:


Para preparar el sancocho,
pongo el pollo,
pongo la yuca,
pongo la papa,
pongo la mazorca,
lo pongo al fuego.

¡El sancocho ya está listo!




When everyone is done making the sancocho together, the game turns into a competition. You will need to set a finish line for everyone to get to. The team who makes it to the finish line first wins the game. You can continue playing until everyone gets tired of it. I recommend playing the game on a field with grass so nobody gets hurt.
This is a video of a Scout Troop playing a version of “las ollitas” game.

Variation: You can use visuals for the students to use while playing the game.

Have fun!

Activities for Summer Camps in Spanish

Running a summer program in Spanish? Don’t worry! Mundo de Pepita and I have you covered. Here we’re sharing some activities that can help you enrich your summer program. 

1. Parachute 

Everyone loves playing this game in summer camps. This link has some activities and a song to use during parachute time.

2. Traditional Games

This post includes 10 cultural games that will add a lot of fun to your camp.

3. El Carnaval de Barranquilla

Host a carnival at your camp! This activity will get everyone dancing and excited about the summer!

Take a trip to Panama, learn about the Kuna people and their art.

Get everyone moving with these 5 Zumba routines that are easy to follow!

Need more activities? Hope over to Mundo de Pepita’s blog
Enjoy the summer!
Carolina

¿Quién Se Comió la Empanada de la Abuela? – Game to Reinforce Vocabulary About Family Members


This game has been motivating my second graders a lot lately. We did a unit on family members, we talked about the diversity in families, and they then described their own immediate families orally and in a small written project.

I modified the well known game called “Who Stole the Cookie for the Cookie Jar?” to support this unit. Instead of a cookie, I printed a picture of an empanada. This added a small cultural twist to the game (and made me hungry for Colombian comfort food…).


I told my students the story of abuelita, who made just one empanada and that someone in the family had eaten it without her permission. I added a detective to this version.

I printed a picture of a detective and gave it to one student. I also gave printed pictures of different family members to the rest of my students. I got them from my “La Familia” set that I have in my TpT store. When you play it, you can also print pictures of family members from other sources.



I gave each student in the room one picture to represent a family member, and I made sure to include pets such as a cat and dog.

Before playing the game, I made sure to go over the lines of the chant. We chanted every line and also helped the detective say his/her line.

How to play the game?

Once you have assigned the different pictures of family members to the students, choose one student to be the detective. The detective will have to leave the classroom. While the detective is outside the room, give a student with the picture of a family member the picture of the empanada. Everyone in the room has to pretend to have the empanada in their hands.

The detective comes back to the classroom and will have three opportunities to guess who has the empanada.

The class chants:
¿Quién se comió la empanada de mi abuela? (two times)
The detective answers:
¿El papá se comió la empanada de la abuela? (two times) Usually the class helps the detective chant.
Depending on who has the empanada the class will answer:
“El papá no se comió la empanada de la abuela.”
or
“El papá sí se comió la empanada de la abuela.”

Remember that the detective has three turns to guess. You can play this game for a long time in class and get everyone using some language skills that they’ve learned in your class.


Have fun playing the game!

10 Cultural Games to Play in Spanish Class

I am always looking for ways to bring some culture to my Spanish class. One way to do it is through the use of traditional games. Below I am sharing links of some games that can be easily used in foreign language Spanish classes. Just click on the links to learn more about each game.

1. La Thunkuna (Boliva)

2. La Pirinola (Mexico)

3. El Patio de Mi Casa (Latin America)

4. Nerón, Nerón  (Nicaragua)

5. La Gallinita Ciega (Latin America)

6. El Ratón y el Gato (Latin America)

7. Juguemos en el Bosque (Latin America)

8. Color, Colorcito (Spain)

9. Pase Misí, Pase Misá (Spain)

10. El Semáforo (World)

Have fun playing!
Carolina

Game: Juguemos en el bosque


I grew up playing this game in Colombia and had tons of fun with it.  I recently used it in a unit on clothes with my second graders. We have played the game outside when the weather is nice, and we’ve also played the game in the classroom with a wolf made out of felt. The children enjoy each of the versions – indoor or outdoor.

The game is simple, just pick a wolf and have everyone else sit in a circle. The wolf will stand up in the middle of the circle while the rest of the class chants.

I made the props for the song using felt (see picture below). We use it to dress the wolf while singing the song. My students love it!

Class: Juguemos en el bosque mientras el lobo no está. ¿Lobo estás?
Lobo: Me estoy poniendo los pantalones.

Class: Juguemos en el bosque mientras el lobo no está. ¿Lobo estás?

Lobo: Me estoy poniendo el chaleco.

Class: Juguemos en el bosque mientras el lobo no está. ¿Lobo estás?

Lobo: Me estoy poniendo el saco.

Class: Juguemos en el bosque mientras el lobo no está. ¿Lobo estás?

Lobo: Me estoy poniendo el sombrero (or sombrerito)

Class: Juguemos en el bosque mientras el lobo no está. ¿Lobo estás?

Lobo: ¡Sí! Y salgo para perseguirte / ¡Sí! Te voy a comer / ¡Sí! Corre

Here is a fun video with the song:


Here is another version of the song:


Have fun playing the game!

Carolina



Game: Un Partido de Fútbol

In preparation for this game you will need felt, pictures of soccer balls, pictures of famous soccer players from different Spanish-speaking countries, and a glue gun to put the felt pieces together.


Once the game is all put together, get ready to play it with students. The idea is to simulate a soccer game in class. Divide the class into two groups and assign a fútbol player to each time. Before playing the game introduce each famous player, and use this opportunity to show their countries of origin on a map and also the names of their teams.

The rules of the game are very simple. Each group will get set on the side of the “field” (cancha) that corresponds to their players. Invite one volunteer from each group to come to the middle. You can use flash cards or a bag filled with objects to represent vocabulary that you have previously explored in class. Show a card or object and ask a question related to it. For example: “¿Qué es? or ¿De qué color es la vaca?”

Whoever answers first will mark a “gol” for his//her team. Invite the class to shout together “¡goooooool!. If they both answer at the same time or the game ends in a tie (empate), then they will have to go into overtime, referred to as “penaltis,” which in the case of this game means they will get a another turn. To keep track of their scores, I place pictures of a soccer ball on their side of the field each time they get a goal.

Un Partido de Fútbol con Piqué (España)

Enjoy el partido de Fútbol!
Carolina