¿Quién Se Comió la Empanada de la Abuela? – Game to Reinforce Vocabulary About Family Members


This game has been motivating my second graders a lot lately. We did a unit on family members, we talked about the diversity in families, and they then described their own immediate families orally and in a small written project.

I modified the well known game called “Who Stole the Cookie for the Cookie Jar?” to support this unit. Instead of a cookie, I printed a picture of an empanada. This added a small cultural twist to the game (and made me hungry for Colombian comfort food…).


I told my students the story of abuelita, who made just one empanada and that someone in the family had eaten it without her permission. I added a detective to this version.

I printed a picture of a detective and gave it to one student. I also gave printed pictures of different family members to the rest of my students. I got them from my “La Familia” set that I have in my TpT store. When you play it, you can also print pictures of family members from other sources.



I gave each student in the room one picture to represent a family member, and I made sure to include pets such as a cat and dog.

Before playing the game, I made sure to go over the lines of the chant. We chanted every line and also helped the detective say his/her line.

How to play the game?

Once you have assigned the different pictures of family members to the students, choose one student to be the detective. The detective will have to leave the classroom. While the detective is outside the room, give a student with the picture of a family member the picture of the empanada. Everyone in the room has to pretend to have the empanada in their hands.

The detective comes back to the classroom and will have three opportunities to guess who has the empanada.

The class chants:
¿Quién se comió la empanada de mi abuela? (two times)
The detective answers:
¿El papá se comió la empanada de la abuela? (two times) Usually the class helps the detective chant.
Depending on who has the empanada the class will answer:
“El papá no se comió la empanada de la abuela.”
or
“El papá sí se comió la empanada de la abuela.”

Remember that the detective has three turns to guess. You can play this game for a long time in class and get everyone using some language skills that they’ve learned in your class.


Have fun playing the game!

El Carnaval de Barranquilla {Cultural Corner}

Every year in February, the city of Barranquilla, Colombia hosts one of the most beautiful carnivals in the world: El Carnaval de Barranquilla. 
 
Picture from the official website
This carnival has been declared by UNESCO as one of the “Masterpieces of Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity.” That’s a mouthful, but it really is amazing! It’s important to share this with our students not only because of its recognition, but also because it’s an opportunity to bring some language to the classes in a colorful way. It’s also worth mentioning that this is the city where Shakira was born and raised.

I am a big fan of using Google Earth in class when doing cultural explorations. You can also add the use of play passport.  With your students, first locate Colombia and then find Barranquilla. Bring the language alive by asking students question such as:
¿En qué continente está Colombia?
¿Cuál es la capital de Colombia?
¿Qué lengua se habla en Colombia?
¿Dónde esta Barranquilla? ¿En el norte o en el sur?
¿Qué pasa en Barranquilla en febrero?


Carnival time is a happy one in Barranquilla. Dances, parades and even children celebrating in their schools. Here is a short video of “El Carnaval de Barranquilla.”


One of the most iconic characters is la Morimonda. It’s a funny character – a combination of monkey and elephant.


Here is a cute video of two kids trying to figure out what “la marimonda” really is.


 


Children recreate Marimonda dances at school.



Here is a video of a professional group of dancers.


Now it’s your turn! Have your students create their own Marimondas and get ready to celebrate carnival in your class!

Download your free mask HERE
Enjoy,
Carolina

Christmas in Colombia

December is a busy month in Colombia. Many schools close early in the month, and everyone gets ready to celebrate “la Navidad” with friends and family. Everything starts on December 7th with “La Noche de la Velitas,” a night  for everyone to celebrate la Inmaculada Concepcion. You will find candles in many houses, and they will stay lit all, night and the celebration continues until December 8th.
 
From December 16 to the 24th, many families gather to recite prayers and sing Christmas songs next to the Nativity scence. This is called “Las Novenas” because it lasts nine days.
 
December 24th is a family night, when everyone awaits with joy the rebirth of “El Niño Jesús.” People share Colombian treats such as natilla, brevas, and manjar blanco to celebrate. The children that attended all the novenas without missing a might will get presents from the family hosting the celebration. This is the most important night when people stay up waiting for Niños Dios to arrive. Children have to go to bed before midnight to be able to receive their presents.
 
December  25th is the day when the children celebrate opening the presents “El Niño Jesús” left next to the Nativity scene, the Christmas tree, or under the bed.
 
All these celebrations lead to December 28th“El Día de los Inocentes,” a day that is similar to April Fools in the United States. It is a day filled with jokes and fun.  
 
And on December 31st everyone gets excited about the New Year and the resolutions it brings. Año Viejos are built in many places to leave the bad things from the previous year behind and make a new start. They are be burned at 12:00am. The five minutes before the year ends are crucial and frantic, with yellow underwear for good luck, suitcases filled to go around the block (to ensure you travel much), a dollar bill in your pocket (you probably get the reason for this one), 12 grapes with 12 wishes or resolutions, and many other exciting and fun thing for a new start to a new year.
 
January 6th is usually not a big day in Colombia, but it is in other countries like Spain. In Colombia, it’s the date that marks the end of the Christmas season which means it’s time to put away the pesebre for next year!

Bringing Different Rhythms to Class {Cultural Corner}

I am one of those Spanish teachers that loves singing in class for many reasons.
Through songs, students learn new vocabulary, internalize grammar structures that may be useful in the future, and explore vocabulary in context – and singing along to a tune is a great way for them to practice pronunciation.

I teach at the elementary level and of course some songs may be complicated for my students. However I ensure there is a natural progression, where I first introduce some basic rhythms, and later, with greater familiarity of beats and timing, we use the rhythms in the various songs we learn in class.  We sing the songs while adding some features of the rhythms and some basic dance steps, which adds some movement to the singing and gets everyone moving in class to break the ice and get circulation moving! I also have a set of flash cards with some famous singers that I show while doing the activity. You can download the cards for this activity HERE.

This is how I use the cards:

Rock: Pretend you are playing an electric guitar while singing.
Bachata: Use a soft voice and pretend to hold a microphone.
Salsa: Sing faster and use the basic Salsa step.
Merengue: Use the Merengue step and sing fast.
Ranchera: Use a deep voice and pretend to hold a sombrero while singing.
Vallenato: Pretend that you are playing an accordion, which is the main instrument in Vallenato.

I have put together a list of songs that go along with the pictures. This might help your students identify the rhythms with the singers. This is also a fun way to bring some culture (and pop culture) into your classes. Feel free to add more traditional rhythms to your list. ¡A cantar y bailar!

 
Happy singing!
Carolina
Pre-K, Kindergarten, First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Homeschooler, Staff - TeachersPayTeachers.com

La Maleta: An End of the Year Tradition {Freebie}

Running around with a maleta (suitcase) in one of the most fun traditions to do at the end of the year. This tradition requires some preparation, but not many things. All you need is a suitcase, some clothes in it, desire to travel during the new year, and a passport if you have one.You only have five minutes to run around the block before the year ends, thinking about all the places you want to go in the new year. 
I have to be honest that I have done this a few times and have gotten great results!

This is an opportunity to pull out a map and point out all the Spanish speaking countries in the world. If possible, use GoogleEarth to take a virtual trip, then invite your students to get their suitcases ready (see freebie below). 
Depending on the level of your students,  you can choose the difficulty of their task. They could complete simple sentences such as “Yo quiero visitar _______________” or write a longer paragraph about the place where they want to go. For example:
1. Yo quiero visitar Colombia.
2. Colombia está en América del Sur.
3. En Colombia se habla español.
4. Los colores de la bandera de Colombia son amarillo, azul y rojo.

Make sure your students have their pasaportes in their suitcases, and have fun running around the room!
Grab your freebie HERE!
Have fun!
Carolina

AÑO NUEVO: LAS DOCE UVAS

AÑO NUEVO: LAS DOCE UVAS

December 31st  is an exciting day in Colombia and many other Spanish speaking countries. Everyone is focused on family and fiesta, and the resolutions and wishes for the New Year come to mind.
Those five minutes before the year ends are especially important. Yellow underwear for  good luck, suitcases filled to go around the block, a dollar bill in your pocket and many other exciting and fun thing for a New Year.

My favorite tradition is “las Doce Uvas”. The tradition of eating twelve grapes that represent wishes for the New Year.  Every grape is eaten when the bell of the end of the year strikes. It strikes 12 times before the New Year stars.

This is a fun tradition to share with your students. Depending on the level you teach have your students make pictures or write about their wishes on every grape (see freebie below). You can also create bunches of grapes (see freebie below) in class and have your students work on just one wish.

Here are some examples of wishes you can teach your students:
1. Yo deseo más recreo.
2. Yo deseo paz.
3. Yo deseo amor.
4. Yo deseo jugar.
5. Yo deseo ver películas en clase.
6. Yo deseo tomar una siesta.
7. Yo deseo comer dulces.
9. Yo deseo tener más amigos.
10. Yo deseo bailar.
11. Yo deseo aprender más español.
12. Yo deseo una fiesta.

A freebie for you! Download it HERE!

 

¡Feliz Año!
Carolina
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